Info of Royal Caribbean International

Royal Caribbean International is the world’s most popular single cruise brand. They own eight biggest ships the world currently has. The latest ship launched by them can accommodate more than 5,000 passengers. With extensive public spaces and amazing deck plans, these ships provide every single passenger with a fascinating experience.

Other than having all kinds of basic amenities one can think of, these gigantic water crafts also has innovations like ice skating rinks, rock climbing walls, surfing stimulators on board. This means, even if you are the most active person in the world, you will never get a chance to get bored while on a ship owned by this cruise line. These ships have activities, amenities and itineraries designed for appealing people of every age group, energy level and taste.

People would enjoy their stay in a Royal Caribbean ship irrespective of the fact whether they are active vacationers or just interested in relaxing for a few days. The cruise line, since the day of its inception, has catered a wide variety of customers including honeymooners, families, singles and retirees.

As mentioned above, ships owned by this cruise line visit a number of ports, all of which have truly breathtaking locations. All the ports of call these ships visit are filled with excitement.

One of the most exciting places you will get to visit as a passenger onboard is Alaska. It’s the land of wildlife and wilderness. There are more natural wonder sin store for you in this locations in form of glaciers.

Royal Caribbean cruise liners will also take you to ports in Bermuda, Bahamas and the Caribbean islands. If you are a true travel enthusiast, you must be aware of the fact what kind of thrills these places have in store for tourists. The ships owned by this famous international cruise line will allow you to experience all.

Travel Destinations in England

  • The London Eye, London: 
    Big fan of panoramic views? Then this is the place for you to go to. This exaggeration of a Ferris wheel literally takes you on the ride of your life. Taking you to a height of 440 feet, the London Eye gives you a look at the whole of London city along with its everyday hustle and bustle. The passenger capsules which carry you up are made of glass thus providing you with the opportunity to have a great 360 degree view of everything. What more do you want?
  • The City Of Bath: 
    You know how they say that good things come in small packages? Well, the city of Bath is the perfect example of this situation. Though small, this city still has a lot of things to offer to its tourists. The Romanian baths, after which this city is named, are the perfect place to relax if you’re looking into getting away from everything. That combined with the Georgian Townhouses all around town will give you the lightheaded experience that you’re looking for.
  • The Buckingham Palace, London:
    One of the few palaces that are in working condition till today, The Buckingham Palace will give you the chance to take a look at the Queen’s guard all dickered out in their finest red and black livery. Do they really not move no matter what happens? Well why don’t you go yourself and find out.
  • The Tower Of London:
    The Tower of London is basically a historic castle that is located on the north bank of the river Thames. This tower of London houses the largest diamond in the world, so even if you’re not a big fan of heights or castles I would still suggest you go there to get a good look at that beauty.
  • The Stonehenge, Salisbury:
    This historical monument located in Wiltshire is popular for its apocalyptic description in pop culture. This ring of stones has so many theories about its origin that hearing them alone wants you to go and see what all the mystery is about. And once you go there, you will be spellbound. That I promise. So plan your trip to the Stonehenge now and just remember that in order to save money all you have to do is Buy British Airways Miles

Trip To Historic City Athens

A trip to Athens or Greece is nothing less than a trip to the pages of history. The ancient architectures are still present, many of them partially demolished, but still bearing the message from the past. The major construction, such as the Parthenon, which happens to be one of the iconic constructions of Athens, speaks of the rich history and culture of the city. The most interesting part about visiting Greece is that there is no specific attraction within the country. When you are in Athens, you will be able expecting various archaeological and historical museums which will speak about the history of the place and also about the various aspects of their art, culture and lifestyle. What really sets Athens apart from the rest of the world is that, even though there are museums and various other places to visit within the city, the city as a whole is living museums in itself. Numerous constructions and various designs can be found all across the city. They have their own story to tell and add to the pages of history of Athens. Make sure you plan your trip long enough to soak up all of it, or as much as it is possible.

Athens has played an important role not in the medieval times; the city has contribution to the modern world as well. One of the most remarkable of all contributions is the Olympic Games. The first modern Olympic Games were held in Athens in the year 1896. Let us not forget the fact that the English that we speak and the alphabets that we write have major contribution from Greece. It is in fact the Greek alphabets that are in use in English in the modern times. Even the word “alphabet” is combination of the words “alpha” and “beta”, the first two Greek letters. It simply shows ho greatly the Greek civilization influenced the development of the western civilization, art and culture.

While planning a trip to Athens, remember that not all that seems old happens to be old in this city. The medieval style and the contemporary designs were very much in use till much later in time. Even when the new city of Athens was built, the contemporary architectural style was followed.

Cuba

Besides Lázaro, we were fortunate to be accompanied by Miami resident Annie Betancourt, founder of Sisters Across the Straits, a Board Director of the League and a member for more than three decades. We were the twenty-sixth group Annie has taken to Cuba. She later explained that ‘it’s complicated’ is the standard response Cubans use to describe any difficult situation. It’s a diplomatic way of saying there is no answer to your question or perhaps there is no solution. ‘It’s complicated’ became the password for our six day adventure in Cuba.

Annie was born in Cuba and lived there with her parents until she was thirteen years old. That was when the revolution occurred and Fidel Castro came into power. Her father, an engineer, understood the changes that were coming and, like hundreds of other Cubans, moved his family to Miami, hoping that their time in that city would be short. But Fidel remained in power and the family soon realized that Miami was their new home.

Annie’s hope is that these visits will improve mutual understanding after decades of isolation and distrust between the US and Cuba. The itineraries, as you will see, are designed to provide League members with opportunities to learn about Cuba’s history, culture and society and to meet both academic experts and ordinary Cuban citizens.

Day 1.

Our flight from Miami to the Jose Marti International Airport in Havana was just 45 minutes long, a reminder that Cuba is only 90 miles from the United States. As soon as our group passed through customs, we boarded the bus and started our tour with a ride through central Havana and the Plaza de la Revolucion. Annie had warned us that we were going to a third world country but it was still a shock to see so many buildings that looked as if they had been bombed. Other buildings appeared very fragile, as if they might collapse at any moment. However, they were obviously inhabited, with people going in and out of the entrances and others hanging wash from balconies ten or fifteen stories high. The American embargo and a failing economy had obviously had a huge impact.

After a lunch stop at an outdoor restaurant in a garden setting, we stopped at the Jose Fuster Studio, the home of a ceramist who has changed the area where he lives. The entire street looked like an immense modern painting with bright colors imbedded in every yard. But as I got closer, I could see the designs created with vibrant ceramics, each one different from the one before. The artist had begun this project by transforming his own gate into an elaborate scene created with ceramics. When neighbors saw the effect, they asked him to do the same to their homes. He never asked for money, always raising funds through donations and by selling his own work. Finally, he transformed his entire courtyard into a ceramic masterpiece. Because the American embargo had made ceramics and just about everything else difficult to obtain, he has been forced to travel great distances to find the tiles he needs.

After we checked in to our temporary home, the Hotel Sevilla, and had a short rest, we joined Annie and most of our fellow travelers for a walk through the Plaza and Calle Obispo – a pedestrian street in Haban Vieja (Old City). Our walk ended at a hotel where Annie had planned to have us eat dinner at its roof-top restaurant. However, like much of Cuba, the elevator was not working. A hotel employee invited us to use the service elevator which was located around the corner. It turned out to be a small, dark box that held five people including the elevator operator. Our group went up in shifts; I went up with my eyes closed and my fingers crossed, convinced that each bump meant we were about to plunge to the ground. However, the view of the city from the top made it all worthwhile. The food was another story.

After dinner, four of us walked down six flights (thank goodness there was a bannister) and made our way through the plaza, looking for a taxi. Finally, we found six of them, all 1950’s automobiles, patched up and roaring to take us back to the hotel. We were herded into the backseat of one and enjoyed a bumpy, breezy and gasoline infused trip back to the hotel. As we were getting out, I noticed that much of the ancient upholstery was held together by tape.

Day 2.

At breakfast, I heard about a lot of problems with the rooms. One of our group had hit the jackpot: her window wouldn’t close, the air conditioning didn’t work, and the door wouldn’t lock. My traveling companion, Pat, and I had been lucky. Although the room was basic (we weren’t expecting anything else), everything worked. In fact, the air conditioning was too cold and we couldn’t seem to turn it down but we weren’t going to complain. The hotel had a lovely swimming pool which we enjoyed almost every afternoon; except for the last day when it was closed down at 5:00 pm for mosquito spraying!

Our first stop was the Cuban Embassy to meet women who were members of the Cuban chapter of the United Nations. The Embassy building had been the home of one of the wealthy Cuban families who had left during the Revolution and it was still in good shape. Soaya E. Alvarez, Director of ACNU Associacion Cubana de las Naciones Unidas, spoke to us about Cuba and the United Nations and the importance of lifting the embargo. The Cuban people are suffering; salaries are $15 to $20 a month; Lázarus (who has a master’s degree) left a government job to become a guide because he could earn more money. Although health care is free, gas and some food is rationed and there is not much left over for luxuries. The Cuban dream is to come to the US; in 2015/16, 153,000 Cubans arrived in the US. People are leaving now because they are afraid the Cuban Adjustment Act, which allows a path to citizenship, will be repealed. Thus, the Cuban workforce has been diminished and the population is aging.

Our next stop was a visit to El Quitrin, a women’s clothing shop sponsored by the Federation of Cuban Women. Annie had suggested we bring thread and needles as gifts for the women working here as these items, like everything else, are in short supply. At the time of our visit, most of the finished dresses and shirts in the shop were white cotton. The work on the clothes was amazing but I didn’t find anything to buy (for a change).

Later in the afternoon, we visited a conservative synagogue and heard about the Jewish population in Cuba from a young woman. There are 1200 Jews in Cuba and three synagogues; a typical situation for Jewish people in any location. But in Cuba, they are either conservative or orthodox; the modern reform movement has not reached Cuba. However, I was glad to hear that girls are having Bat Mitzvahs.

That evening, three of us took a taxi to a restaurant for dinner and made the acquaintance of a young driver who spoke excellent English. The taxi was brand new, had leather seats and purred as it made its way through town. Our driver told us it was made in China and purchased by the Cuban government. He was leasing it from the government and sharing it with another driver; each had three days on and three days off. He was married and had a toddler. When we asked him about President Obama’s visit, he said, with emotion, “Obama is our hero.”

Day 3.

Annie had arranged a visit to the newly opened U.S. Embassy. I was surprised at the amount of security – our passports were carefully examined and our bags were checked. We entered through a turnstile and were seated in a room right off the entrance. An embassy director who had been sent to Cuba to prepare for Obama’s visit gave us an overview of our country’s situation and answered all our questions. It was thorough and interesting. She encouraged us to interact with Cubans to dispel any negative impressions they might have about Americans.

At the end of the sidewalk in front of the entrance to the American Embassy, there is a football field of very tall black poles that look like they had been planted. Annie told us that, right after the Revolution, the American Embassy began running a ticker tape with a message about freedom along the top of the building. To retaliate, the Cuban government put up the poles and topped them with the Cuban flag to block out the tape.

Our next stop was Finca Vigia, the home of Nobel Prize laureate Ernest Hemingway who lived in Cuba from 1930 to 1960. Pat and I had seen the movie “Papa Hemingway in Cuba” just a few days before our trip so it was exciting to look in the windows and doors and see where the movie had been filmed. His fishing boat Pilar has been restored and is on display at the property.

We had lunch in Cojimar, a fishing village that was the backdrop of Hemingway’s novel, “The Old Man and the Sea.” I looked out at the water and could almost see the old man rowing the boat. Lunch was at a privately owned restaurant run by young local entrepreneurs and it was delicious. Many restaurants in Cuba are owned and operated by the government but more and more people are getting permission to open their own restaurants, a very good sign.

Day 4.

Breakfasts at the hotel were enormous; five large tables filled with everything from fruit to meats to pancakes or eggs and sweet breads. By now I knew our lunches would be huge – at least four courses – so I stuck to cereal, fruit and yogurt (at least I think it was yogurt) for breakfasts. I also decided I would not weigh myself for a week after I got home.

We walked through Old Havana and visited the plazas. There were dozens of stands selling books and street artists were everywhere, displaying their work on boards and boxes. One young man followed our group, drawing quick profiles of a few women and then trying to sell the sketch to the owner. He was remarkably good and we later found out he was an art student. One woman bought her sketch; then discovered that it looked more like another member of our group. Then we visited an artisans’ cooperative and I bought a small painting to take home (my first purchase).

In the afternoon we visited the Museum of Fine Arts- Cuban Collection and I was so awed by the art that I kept moving even when my body was telling me to go back to the hotel and take a nap. Of course the elevator was out here also so we did a lot of walking.

Day 5.

A day in the country! The bus took us through the countryside for over an hour and Lázaro kept us awake with a lesson on Cuba’s history. Now and then, Annie took over the microphone, giving Lázaro a rest and us some background from the American point of view. We arrived at lookout point in Valle Vinales in Pinar del Rio Province which is west of Havana. The unique hill formations (known as mogotes) are gorgeous; unlike anything I’ve seen before.

Then we moved on to a rum distillery (not sure that’s what it’s called) and then a tobacco farm. We watched a man actually roll cigars which almost made me want to smoke one. Of course I bought some for my husband; he smokes one occasionally but only when I’m not home.

Lunch was on the porch of a charming country restaurant. Annie warned us there would be a lot of courses and there were; one after another, each one better than the last. Dessert was the best flan I have ever eaten.

I thought I’d never eat again but by 7:30, I was at yet another restaurant eating the best eggplant lasagna I’d ever had.

Day 6.

Time to pack our suitcases for our trip back to Miami that evening. But in the meantime, we were still moving. We visited a local arts and craft market where I searched for (and found) a humidor in which to put my five precious cigars. I also bought a beautiful, hand-made white cotton dress for my granddaughter which will probably not fit but I couldn’t resist it. Next, our group visited an art community project in inner city Centro Habana. An artist named Salvador Gonzales Escolono first started developing art from graffiti until galleries opened and it became a street of art celebrating the African/Cuban experience. Salvador, who was leaving for Washington and New York the next day, was at his gallery and he told us to “enjoy my country but don’t try to understand it.”

Lunch was at an organic farm that also provides meals for people in need, painting and environmental classes plus classes for single mothers and seniors. When the government gave the land to the family that has produced all this, it was a swamp area. Now they grow 150 different varieties of fruits and vegetables (plus a little dog that kept getting underfoot). The lunches help pay for the free food and classes.

Next stop: The airport and the end of our adventure in Cuba. But first, I and several other travelers checked out all the duty free shops, trying to spend what was left of our Cuban money. I settled on two bottles of vintage rum which my husband tells me tastes like smooth bourbon.

Selecting the Best Hotel at a Tourist Place

  • The first work you will do is to filter and sort hotels on the basis of facilities they provide and the budget you can afford. First of all, put in the name of the city and the date on which you need to book a hotel.
  • After filtering date and locations wise, now you can sort resorts amenity wise. There are hotels which offer free Wi-Fi services, parking and swimming facilities to guests. I for myself will always select a hotel offering these amenities.
  • If you are travelling along with your family then you can look for a family hotel in the city and travel with a Girlfriend or wife, then you can look for a “romantic” type of hotel.
  • A good hotel is one that is located close to the airport and has decent road and rail links. Although these resorts mention these details in their description, it is not possible for a traveller to read the description of each hotel.
  • There are some hotels booking sites that show hotels on a single map. You can use their map to find a hotel that meets your travel requirements.
  • Some people intentionally look for a hotel that offers its guests free breakfast while as others don’t consider free breakfast as that much important. Similarly, some homestay have free Wi-Fi service for guests. If you really need internet then only makes it a deciding factor.
  • These days every hotel has its own website where they make announcements and update their guests about any new development. People post their reviews directly on their website. Read those reviews and what people think about the hotel.
  • Price is the deciding factor when it comes to making a hotel booking for an average person. An average income person may not be able to afford a costly hotel. Booking engines sort hotels price wise. Some resorts offer discounts to their guests. So check out that which hotel in the city is offering discounts on bookings.

Planning Family Cruise

Check on the children’s facilities.

Verify if the ship provides essential items that your children will need. If you have a young kid traveling with you, check if they have cribs, high chair, toys and other stuff that children need. You might as well ask if they have a special menu for children.

Ask if they provide babysitting services.

Now this is really important, as you cannot be with your child all the time. The reason you had the cruise is to relax and unwind, hence, you cannot always be with your child. A babysitter can give you the break that you need so you can go to the spa, have a swim or enjoy the dancing. Do not forget how much it cost, by the way.

The activities conducted onboard.

Inquire on the programs they have for the family. Cruise liners have a program of activities for the whole family to enjoy as well as those intended for children depending on their ages.

The cabins.

You can either get a separate cabin for your children or get one that can accommodate the whole family. Whatever your choice is, make sure that everybody will be comfortable and safe for the children. If you are a family of four, I would suggest you get the standard cabin, as it has 4 beds.

Your luggage.

Ensure that everything you need is packed inside your luggage. Traveling with kids would entail to bring more kid’s clothes. Toiletries such as lotion, baby wipes, alcohol, etc. must be included in your luggage. Bring a first-aid kit, and have plaster, seasick pills and other medical items that may be needed during your travel.

Travelling Tips Suitable for Couples

Decide and agree as a couple with your itinerary

Before proceeding with your trip, it would be advisable to agree with an itinerary for your trip. Decide as a couple on where to go, what activities to do, hotels to book, flights to take as well as your seats on the plane. It would be advisable to agree on the schedule for your trip because some people are comfortable traveling at night time or some with day time. Have your whole trip planned, even the possible side trips so that both of you would enjoy and would be less stressed during the trip.

Decide and agree on mutual expenses

Whether you are travelling with a friend or with a love one, it would be best to agree on who will shoulder the expenses or how much the both of you are capable of spending for your trip. Money can destroy friendships and relationships, let alone if you travel with a mere acquaintance. Decide on what, where and how much both of you are willing to spend for the trip. Have a budget and stick with your budget as much as possible.

Allow “me” time during your trip

Even though you are traveling with a partner or a love one, it would be best to have alone time for each other. One might enjoy a walk on the beach alone during day break while the other one might prefer meditating inside the hotel room before going to bed. Respect each other’s “me” time so that both of you get to enjoy and reflect individually during your trip.

Places To Visit In City Avignon

Avignon became the official residence under Pope Clement V in 1309. His successor, John XXII, made it the capital of Christianity and transformed his former episcopal palace into the primary Palace of the Popes. It was the official residence of seven popes from 1309 to 1377. Nowadays, 25 rooms are open to the public and although most of the furnishings have disappeared, one can still see how vast the place was.

Go to Place de l’Horloge to have a cool drink at a café and watch the world go by. This is a very beautiful square and is the centre of life in Avignon. On one side is the theatre and the Town Hall. The Town Hall itself was built in 1845 and incorporates a beautiful 14th century clock tower with life-sized figures on top.

The Musee du Petit Palais is an art gallery and museum. It houses an exceptional collection of Renaissance paintings of the Avignon school as well as art from Italy and is in a 14th century building at the north side of the square.

Another place well worth a visit is the Rocher des Doms. These are beautiful leafy gardens set on a hill, with views of the river and surrounding countryside.
For those interested in art, a visit to the Musee Angladon is not to be missed. This museum contains paintings and furniture and it is enjoyable to wander around if you have the time.

Or those interested in natural history, don’t miss a visit to the Musee Requien which is named after the French naturalist, Esprit Requien.

The Jewish community in Avignon goes back as far as the first century after the destruction of the Second Temple in Jerusalem. However, there aren’t any written records of Jewish culture and history before the 12th century. The first Jewish quarter faced the Palais des Papes on Rue de la Vielle Juiverie. By the early 13th century, the Jewish quarter was on Rue Jacob and Place Jerusalem. Today, this is where the shul is located. It is a tiny area, about 100 square yards and it was home to more than 1000 people. It was forbidden by law for Jews to live outside the designated area, which was surrounded by walls. They had to have permission to leave this site for religious tours in France and three locked gates kept them from leaving.

Great Cruise Destinations

The Caribbean

Top of the list is the Caribbean, often considered as the epitome of a dream cruise. This popular destination is very much the “traditional” cruise; most people who think of cruising imagine the white sands and warm waters of the Caribbean. Choice wise, the cruises to the Caribbean split off to either cover the eastern or western islands, with the main difference being the islands you visit; both locations allow you to enjoy many opportunities for snorkelling, scuba diving, para-sailing and jet skiing.

The Mediterranean

The second most popular cruise destination; often seen as one for those who enjoy variety. Mediterranean cruises tend to be popular amongst those who enjoy experience many different countries and cultures on one trip. With all the destinations on offer in the Mediterranean, the cruises to this part of the world tend to run for longer periods of time, allowing you to get the most of places such as Rome, Barcelona, Italy, Turkey, Venice and the Greek islands. These far ranging trips really do allow for a wide range of travel experiences.

Alaska

Off to cooler climes with our third destination, Alaska. Cruises usually visit this impressive coastline between May and September to avoid the harsh winters. A cruise to Alaska is a great way to soak up some of the beauty and wonder of the great outdoors, with views of rugged mountain ranges, dense forest and spectacular coast from the deck. The area is also well known for its wildlife, with whales, bald eagles and bears being the most popular sightings. Shore excursions on an Alaskan cruise tend to be fairly active making them a great way to get some exercise and stretch the legs, dog sledding, hiking and wildlife tours all allow you to get the best out of your trip.

Argentina Valley

Campo Marzio is a small mound in the most accented bottleneck of the river, marked by remains of a pre-Roman town and by its subsequent Roman fortifications. The first town of the Valle Argentina is Badalucco in a crossroad position for itineraries from the bottom of the valley towards the mountain. The village throngs its rough-hewn stone houses on the hill in front of Mount Faudo. In the village, made of stone, to invade every corner and take advantage of every cleavage, one finds imposing arcane figures nested in frescoes and, in the damp and silent alleyways, a permanent art gallery in the open exhibits sculptures ceramics and sculptured slate. The “sagra du stocafissu a baiicogna” is the colorful touch that attracts to the village, during the month of September of each year, throngs of tourists and “gourmets”.

Following the provincial road, but turning right and after some short bends, you meet Montalto Ligure in a panoramic position. The legend has it that, around the year one thousand, a young married couple who escaped from the “jus primae noctis” (the right of the first night), established this village. Here the Romanesque parish church of San Giorgio preserves valuable frescoes; the baroque parish church is rich of prestigious paintings, such as polyptych by Ludovico Breashed this village. Here the Romanesque parish church of San Giorgio preserves valuable frescoes; the baroque parish church is rich of prestigious paintings, such as polyptych by Ludovico Brea.

Carpasio is a mountain village, with its low houses with slate roofs, impressive because of the suggestion given by the overlapping of its alleyways and its covered passageways, dominated by the majestic bell tower of the church of Sant’ Antonino. Returning on the provincial road, going up the valley, the traveler meets the village of the twenty-three watermills, Molini di Triora, with its fifteenth century origin baroque parish church and the sanctuary of Nostra Signora della Month. Here, every year in September, vacationers from the coast, converge for a meeting of great gastronomy, the “sagra delle lumache” (the snail festival). Also worthy of being visited, are the neighboring hamlets of Andagna and Corte.

In the past it was the granary of the Republic of Genoa and Podesteria, today Triora is known as the “town of the witches” owing to a trial held in 1588 and concluded, with a sentence of guilt for witchcraft of a group of local women who, because of their meeting in a secluded place (the Cabotina), were deemed guilty of the impending famine. There is memory of that event in the local ethnographic and witchcraft museum, for the luck of shops and handcraft workshops that display funny sorceress dolls and sell liquor of the witch and snail milk, well-mixed together concoctions of grappa (distilled liquor) and aromatic herbs. The medieval village is an art jewel, steep, rough, built without obstructions, whole in its defense system of gates, arches, alleyways and fortressed-houses.